Children Don’t Need School (8)

All day long, the law of God applies to the affairs of men. Fathers were to spend time with their sons, either in the fields or in the family business. Sons were to receive knowledge of the law in the context of profitable labor. The familiar phrase, “learning by doing,” was applicable. It was a system of instruction we might call “learning while doing.” The law was not some abstract legal code. It was an integrated system of rules that was supposed to be taught in the context of daily living. God’s Bible-revealed law was not to become peripheral in the lives of God’s covenant people. It was to be central. It was to govern men’s activities throughout the day. It was to be memorized, discussed, and acted upon by young and old.

Fathers were not to tell their sons, “Do as I say, not as I do.” Their lives were to become consistent with their words. The sons would hear God’s law and see their fathers carrying it out. This law mandated a mastery of the details of biblical law to all those who were covenanted to Him. All of this has been lost to modern man. Today, formal education is not Bible-based, family-based, occupation-based, or personal. It is humanism-based, state-based, abstract, and bureaucratic. It is also intensely feminine in the early years.[1]

The church and the family are both important social institutions. Whilst they are different, they have a lot in common. One thing they are both required to do is to train people for the future. We call that discipleship. Fathers are to raise children

…in the discipline and admonition of the Lord (Eph.6:4).

Jesus was a teacher, too:

And He went up on the mountain and summoned those whom He Himself wanted, and they came to Him. And He appointed twelve, so that they would be with Him, and that He could send them out to preach, and to have authority to cast out the demons (Mk.1:13-15).

Paul also tells us that the apostles, prophets, evangelists, pastors and teachers in the church are there for the

…equipping of the saints for the work of service, to the building up of the body of Christ… (Eph.4:11-12).

The training of children is required to be commenced by fathers, in particular. The successful teaching and discipleship of children in the family, is an important prerequisite for church leadership, too.

Jesus summoned the disciples, they came to Him, and they were with Him. This mirrors the task of parents with their children, who have children, then are responsible to train them.

And the school?

It’s not in the Bible. The family is the first and possibly most important place of instruction.

Paul made reference to this. Speaking to Timothy, he wrote that

…I am mindful of the sincere faith within you, which first dwelt in your grandmother Lois and your mother Eunice, and I am sure that it is in you as well (II Tim.1:5).

Conclusion:

When it comes to education, fathers are not to neglect their roles, or delegate their teaching responsibility totally to their wife, and go off to work. Adam neglected his care of Eve in the garden, leaving her to deal with a demonic attack, defenceless. That was negligence and slothful, and he hadn’t cared for her. It’s sad when fathers do the same thing today in relation to their children’s education.

This suggests to children that their education is for mothers to accomplish, not their father, which is simply unbiblical. It opens the door to all manner of unnecessary problems.

But the active and vigilant father, involved in his children’s education, gives the whole process credibility in the eyes of his boys and girls. By implication, this must be an important issue, because Dad’s involved with Mum in this! Thus the likelihood of success and ultimate fulfilment is far higher.

Isn’t that what you want, too?


[1] Gary North, “Inheritance and Dominion,” 1999, p.145-46.

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